Tag Archives: Miracle

Curiosity

In an earlier post, I wrote about how our son’s curiosity for and resulting fascination with everything in life reminds me that each new moment is a miracle.

In that post, the reason I gave for why we often default to living as though nothing is a miracle is that we’ve experienced many things before.

However, there’s also a second reason why we often default to this approach. And that is that most of what we’re guided to do, especially as a child, is to complete tasks in predetermined subject areas. Rather than ask the questions that interest us and follow the paths that result from our attempts to answer these questions, we’re guided to complete predetermined tasks without asking questions. In other words, we’re guided to set aside our own curiosity for what society believes we should be curious about, to the extent that society believes we should be curious about it.

Fortunately, our own curiosity does not go away. It sits there, beneath layers of externally constructed interests.

Just like our son, and just like when you were a child, you just have to have the courage to let your curiosity surface.

A miracle

Our son is over 4 months old now. Before his birth, I was looking forward to the many things that I would have the opportunity to teach him. After all, he is quite a bit less experienced.

And the time for that teaching will likely come when he grows older and begins to perform activities like going to school, playing with friends, and doing work.

However, at his current age, I’m learning more from him than he is from me. My learnings are taking place in many areas, but one that really stands out is what he teaches me as a result of his innate curiosity for and resulting fascination with everything in life.

The fascination with which he examines someone he meets for the first time.

The fascination with which he tastes something new (even though they’re only liquids so far).

The fascination with which he watches new places from the window of the car.

The fascination with which he listens to a new sound.

And so much more.

There’s a quote, attributed to Einstein, which goes as follows: “There are only two ways to live your life. One is as though nothing is a miracle. The other is as though everything is a miracle.”

As adults, since we’ve experienced many things before, we often default to the former.┬áHowever, while a specific experience may be similar, the actual moment we’re experiencing is always new.

When I observe our son, I’m reminded that each new moment is a miracle.