Sustainable success as an e-commerce company

E-commerce sites across verticals use informational content as a way to differentiate themselves from their competitors. The reasoning is that if they attract visitors by providing informational content about the third party products they’re selling, once informed, these visitors will also purchase the products they were looking for on the same site.

At the margin, this is likely true. Providing a visitor with extensive informational content prior to making a purchase helps build trust which makes the visitor more likely to transact on the same e-commerce site. However, very often this earned trust isn’t enough to overcome differences in the price of the product on different sites. If the product is cheaper elsewhere, the visitor simply learns about the product at your site before transacting at the site with the lowest price.

This is especially true for commoditized product categories and verticals with strong third party brand names. For such product categories, the marketplace approach of aggregating and showcasing the third party products available from different suppliers, thereby letting the customer compare the prices of these products to buy from the supplier offering the product at the lowest price, is more defensible in the long term than the e-commerce approach.

This leaves the creation of a new proprietary brand as the remaining approach to achieving sustainable success as an e-commerce company.


Also published on Medium.