Startups, growth, and valuation multiples

When you invest in a startup, you invest at a very steep valuation multiple.

It isn’t possible to justify the valuation at which you’re investing using traditional multiples like revenue, gross margin, EBITDA, or net income. The latter two are almost always negative, and depending on the stage at which you’re investing, the first two range from small to non-existent. Your reason for investing is that you believe that the startup will grow to produce revenue, gross margin, EBITDA, and net income in the future. It is this growth that you pay for.

However, even if the startup is successful in growing to produce these figures, the relevant multiple at which it is valued in the future is very often lower than that which you invested at. The reason is that even healthy businesses are eventually valued at traditional multiples that reflect a lower growth trajectory.

As a result, for an investor to make money in a startup investment, the increase in the company’s valuation which is produced by the company’s growth needs to offset the decline in the company’s valuation which will take place as a result of the lower future valuation multiple assigned to it.

This is why growth is so important for startups. If it stops or declines, even if the company is able to manage its costs so as to achieve break-even, the decline in valuation multiples makes it very difficult to achieve a return on your investment.


Also published on Medium.